Preperation Tips

Steaks
Allow steaks to temper to room temperature for approx. one hour. Our steak is best served between medium-rare and medium (135°F to 145°F). Sear the meat over the heat source, let the juices rise to the uncooked surface, turn once (use tongs rather than a fork), remove from heat and allow to rest at least five minutes before serving.

Burgers
To make a great burger, cook to about medium-well (160°F). Sear the meat over the heat source, let the juices rise to the uncooked surface, turn once (use tongs rather than a fork), remove from heat and allow to rest at least five minutes before serving.

Slow Roasting
Allow roasts to temper to room temperature before cooking. When roasting cuts like pot roast and brisket, it's best to season overnight. Then sear the roast in olive oil on both sides, immerse in stock with vegetables, cover tightly and finish in a 325°F oven for three to four hours.
 

Recipes

Kitchen Window's Ultimate Burger

Mary Jane’s Meatloaf

Smoked Beef Brisket

100% Grass-Fed Beef Italian Beef

Garlic and Beer Braised Beef Sandwiches

Juniper-spiced Tenderloin

Perfectly Roasted Prime Rib

100% Grass-Fed Beef Chili

Beef Stew In Large Crock-Pot

100% Grass-Fed BBQ Pull Apart Beef

 

Grilling Grass-Fed Beef
(IT TAKES A LITTLE LONGER, BUT IT’S WORTH IT.)

The difference between cooking grass-fed beef and corn-fed beef is based upon how much intramuscular fat there is. Fat conducts heat (think of a deep-fat fryer – that’s also fat conducting heat).

In a steak, fat conducts heat from the outside of the steak to the inside. A corn-fed steak cooks faster, since it’s essentially pre-larded with fat, there’s more wiggle room for a cook to goof up and still have things work out.

In contrast, with grass-fed, your main goal is to not overcook.

"Grass fed beef will cook slower," says award-winning Chef JD Fratzke of The Strip Club.
"But I’ve never really treated grass-fed beef that much differently than corn-fed."

JD's FIVE STEPS FOR A PERFECT STEAK:

  1. Start with a steak that’s at least 1-1/2” thick.
  2. Build a fire that’s hot on one side (or get a grill pan very, very hot).
  3. Get caramelization marks and a nice crust over the hottest part of the fire (or pan).
  4. Cook over lower heat. After you’ve got your steak caramelized, move it to a cooler part of the grill (or put it in the oven on low heat).
  5. Remove from heat and let rest, like you would for any steak, to let the juices redistribute.
Slice and serve.